Laurie R. King http://laurierking.com New York Times Bestselling Author Tue, 16 Aug 2016 14:03:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 “Echoes” is coming http://laurierking.com/2016/08/echoes-is-coming/ http://laurierking.com/2016/08/echoes-is-coming/#comments Tue, 16 Aug 2016 14:03:03 +0000 http://laurierking.com/?p=13303 This just in from Publishers Weekly about (next month’s!) Echoes of Sherlock Holmes: King and Klinger’s strong third Sherlockian anthology (after 2014’s In the Company of Sherlock Holmes) features 17 stories from leading authors who draw on Conan Doyle’s work for inspiration. The end result is a rich variety of entries, including Tony Lee and Bevis Musson’s “Mrs. […]

The post “Echoes” is coming appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
This just in from Publishers Weekly about (next month’s!) Echoes of Sherlock Holmes:Echoes 3D

King and Klinger’s strong third Sherlockian anthology (after 2014’s In the Company of Sherlock Holmes) features 17 stories from leading authors who draw on Conan Doyle’s work for inspiration. The end result is a rich variety of entries, including Tony Lee and Bevis Musson’s “Mrs. Hudson Investigates,” a post-Reichenbach mystery in comic book format. David Morrell sensitively examines Conan Doyle’s obsession with spiritualism in “The Spiritualist,” in which the writer has an unexpected encounter in London’s Psychic Book Shop, Library and Museum. John Connolly displays his gift for subtle satire in “Holmes on the Range,” set in his Caxton Private Lending Library and Book Depository, a home for fictional characters who have “assumed an objective reality” (including Holmes and Watson). Another high point is William Kent Krueger’s “The Painted Smile,” in which a therapist treats a child determined to have his identification with Holmes taken seriously. Other contributors include Anne Perry, Hallie Ephron, and Gary Phillips.

And that’s not even touching on (deep breath) Tasha Alexander, Dana Cameron, Deborah Crombie, Cory Doctorow, Meg Gardiner, Jonathan Maberry, Catriona McPherson, Denise Mina, Hank Phillippi Ryan, or Michael Scott.   The list of contributors is here.

**

You can pre-order this amazing collection (signed, by at least one of us) from Poisoned Pen or Bookshop Santa Cruz, or as an unsigned or e- book from Barnes & Noble or Amazon.

The post “Echoes” is coming appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
http://laurierking.com/2016/08/echoes-is-coming/feed/ 1
No hand-bag clutching in NOLA http://laurierking.com/2016/08/no-hand-bag-clutching-nola/ http://laurierking.com/2016/08/no-hand-bag-clutching-nola/#respond Mon, 15 Aug 2016 10:18:26 +0000 http://laurierking.com/?p=13299 The first mystery conference I ever attended was in London, in 1990. At the time, I had a separate agent for the English/Commonwealth market, and she happened to mention that there was this conference that I might go to… Because it coincided with family stuff, I went. And found it interesting, and informative, and more […]

The post No hand-bag clutching in NOLA appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
The first mystery conference I ever attended was in London, in 1990. At the time, I had a separate agent for the English/Commonwealth market, and she happened to mention that there was this conference that I might go to…

Because it coincided with family stuff, I went. And found it interesting, and informative, and more than a little intimidating.

This was the first year BoucherCon was held out of the US. (It returned to the UK five years later, in Nottingham—which, as it happened, was the second fan conference I ever attended. I’ve been a bit more regular since then.) It was held in King’s College, LondonKings_College_London_Sign

which was great fun and very central, but probably the worst venue imaginable for the purpose of an international crime conference, particularly for a new writer. (I wasn’t published until 1993.)   I knew no one, and I was staying with family out in West London, so the only place I encountered people were on the stairs and corridors, of which there seemed a huge number. There was no central place to hang out and awkwardly venture a conversation, other than the student cafeteria, which was a long and winding set of hallways distant.

Unknown-1

(Not a King’s College hallway…)

As I remember, the book room was smushed into a sort of wide passageway. The only event I remember after all these years was an interview of PJ James, during which Q&A a decidedly odd lady in a houndstooth cape and deerstalker cap held up a dog hand puppet and announced, “Sherlock Hound wants to know, why did you use Devices and Desires as the title of one book and a chapter title in another?”Unknown

(Is my memory of the author eyeing the exit and clutching her handbag factual, or interpretive?)

This year’s BoucherCon is in New Orleans, and promises to be a very different experience from that of King’s College. For one thing, it’ll be nice and warm. For another, Echoes of Sherlock Holmes will be out,Echoes 3D

and a bunch of the authors will be there with their pens.  But primarily, the company of readers is fabulous and the panels will be way cool. Such as the one I’m sharing with five other woman and Andrew Grant (who promises he looks quite fetching in a corset.  I’m still waiting to see the promised photograph.)Bcon 2016

See you in the French Quarter!th

The post No hand-bag clutching in NOLA appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
http://laurierking.com/2016/08/no-hand-bag-clutching-nola/feed/ 0
The Writer/Library Admiration Socie http://laurierking.com/2016/08/writerlibrary-admiration-socie/ http://laurierking.com/2016/08/writerlibrary-admiration-socie/#respond Thu, 11 Aug 2016 09:30:39 +0000 http://laurierking.com/?p=13283 MWA NorCal joins forces with the Oakland library this Saturday for: Loving the Library If you’re a regular reader of Mutterings, you know that I love libraries. This Saturday, I get to interview Emily Weak, the adult services librarian at the Rockridge branch, about how writers and libraries make for a mutual admiration society. I’ll […]

The post The Writer/Library Admiration Socie appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
MWA header night

MWA NorCal joins forces with the Oakland library this Saturday for:

Loving the Library

If you’re a regular reader of Mutterings, you know that I love libraries. This Saturday, I get to interview Emily Weak, the adult services librarian at the Rockridge branch, about how writers and libraries make for a mutual admiration society. I’ll be asking things like, how can we authors best work with libraries? What resources do libraries have for us? And what do librarians need from us? How can a writer both use libraries, and help them?

Please come join us, this Mystery Writers of America/NorCal event is open to all.

 August 13, 11:30-12:30

Oakland Public Library—Rockridge Branch

5366 College Avenue

Oakland, CA

The post The Writer/Library Admiration Socie appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
http://laurierking.com/2016/08/writerlibrary-admiration-socie/feed/ 0
Naming a not-so-new baby http://laurierking.com/2016/08/naming-not-new-baby/ http://laurierking.com/2016/08/naming-not-new-baby/#comments Thu, 04 Aug 2016 16:05:57 +0000 http://laurierking.com/?p=13274 Hey, friends–I’m in the process of making a new web site with just that things on it that readers have contributed–the art, writing, crossword puzzles, etc that we’ve done in various contests and promos over the years, along with pieces that I’ve done for events and such. So my question for you is: what do we call […]

The post Naming a not-so-new baby appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
Hey, friends–I’m in the process of making a new web site with just that things on it that readers have contributed–the art, writing, crossword puzzles, etc that we’ve done in various contests and promos over the years, along with pieces that I’ve done for events and such.1879 Garments Handout - Murder of Mary Russell

So my question for you is: what do we call that site? Laurie King Fan Art? (Which sounds a bit as if I’ve done the art.) The King Community? Russell & Holmes: Art in the Blood? Suggestions, please!

The post Naming a not-so-new baby appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
http://laurierking.com/2016/08/naming-not-new-baby/feed/ 8
Bundling Russell & Holmes http://laurierking.com/2016/08/bundling-russell-holmes/ http://laurierking.com/2016/08/bundling-russell-holmes/#respond Wed, 03 Aug 2016 19:53:24 +0000 http://laurierking.com/?p=13271 There’s a bundle of Russells, waiting to slip into your e-reader or cell phone: It’s probably inevitable that the first book in any series is the biggest seller, even if readers loved it. Confronted with a list of a dozen titles, people tend to skip over numbers two through ten or so, I suppose because […]

The post Bundling Russell & Holmes appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
There’s a bundle of Russells, waiting to slip into your e-reader or cell phone:9781250130976

It’s probably inevitable that the first book in any series is the biggest seller, even if readers loved it. Confronted with a list of a dozen titles, people tend to skip over numbers two through ten or so, I suppose because going on to number two feels like committing to all the ones in between.

And I agree, fourteen or fifteen dollars apiece does seem substantial for books that were published in the nineties. (And no, the author has no say on price. Although yes, the amount I earn depends on what they charge.)

So it’s nice when publishers decide to bundle up numbers of books and sell them at a discount. Random House has a nice pile of the later Russells (nine titles, from O Jerusalem to Dreaming Spies) that works out to about $9 apiece, and Picador’s trio of Martinellis (A Grave Talent; To Play the Fool; With Child) come in at $8 per title.

So now, Picador has a bundle of Russells for you, numbers 2, 3, and 4 in the series. A Monstrous Regiment of Women, A Letter of Mary, and The Moor take you from Mary’s 21st birthday and its meditation on independence through the couple’s early days and on to Hound of the Baskervilles territory.   The three come for $19.99, which my mathematical computations tell me is around six and a half dollars each.

An electronic pleasure, waiting for you on your device.

(And yes, this one is in the US only–if there’s a UK offer, I’ll let you know!)

* *

The Russell series #2-4 e-book bundle (A Monstrous Regiment of Women; A Letter of Mary; The Moor) for your KindleNookiBook, or through the publisher’s site.

The post Bundling Russell & Holmes appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
http://laurierking.com/2016/08/bundling-russell-holmes/feed/ 0
A deal on Murder! http://laurierking.com/2016/07/a-deal-on-murder/ http://laurierking.com/2016/07/a-deal-on-murder/#comments Sun, 31 Jul 2016 09:16:38 +0000 http://laurierking.com/?p=13260 The Murder of Mary Russell is going for a rapid paddle down the Great Brazilian River today. Yes, a special offer. You get the whole book, all the words, for just $2.99 [STOP THE PRESSES IT SEEMS TO BE $1.99 WHEE!] (yeah, it’s the e-book and probably just the US, sorry) so you can tuck […]

The post A deal on Murder! appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
The Murder of Mary Russell is going for a rapid paddle down the Great Brazilian River today. Yes, a special offer. You get the whole book, all the words, for just $2.99

[STOP THE PRESSES IT SEEMS TO BE $1.99 WHEE!]

(yeah, it’s the e-book and probably just the US, sorry) so you can tuck it away in your cell phone to entertain yourself standing in line at the DMV or next time your flight is cancelled or…

MurderOfMary-UK-cvrHey, I write entertainments, and I’m happy to offer you and all your friends  a three buck distraction. So tell everyone, and today, that it’s right here. Yay!

The post A deal on Murder! appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
http://laurierking.com/2016/07/a-deal-on-murder/feed/ 2
The craft of crime http://laurierking.com/2016/07/13250/ http://laurierking.com/2016/07/13250/#comments Tue, 19 Jul 2016 10:23:38 +0000 http://laurierking.com/?p=13250 One of my favorite of the year’s mystery get-togethers is not a fan conference (although I love BoucherCon, and Left Coast Crime, and…) but one on the craft of writing. The Book Passage conference has a great track record with getting new writers published, and it’s a great place to meet your community, both in […]

The post The craft of crime appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
One of my favorite of the year’s mystery get-togethers is not a fan conference (although I love BoucherCon, and Left Coast Crime, and…) but one on the craft of writing.

UnknownThe Book Passage conference has a great track record with getting new writers published, and it’s a great place to meet your community, both in classes and in chats over coffee, breakfast, you have it.

I don’t participate every year, but this year I am, and I’ll be doing several events:

Thursday, July 28th

7:30 pm – Headline event (Jackie Winspear interviewing me)

Friday, July 29th

Writing Intensive: Character

What’s That Sound? Creating, Maintaining, And Intensifying Tension

Saturday, July 30th

Revision: Writing is Rewriting

Sunday, July 31st

Writing Intensive: Putting it in Perspective – How POV Shapes Your Story

Hope you join us, I think they still have a few places left. Take a look at the list of other great writers, here.

The post The craft of crime appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
http://laurierking.com/2016/07/13250/feed/ 3
Love for Echoes http://laurierking.com/2016/07/love-for-echoes/ http://laurierking.com/2016/07/love-for-echoes/#comments Fri, 15 Jul 2016 13:14:58 +0000 http://laurierking.com/?p=13240 PW chose it as one of their top ten mysteries for the fall, and now Kirkus reviews loves them some Echoes of Sherlock Holmes, too: “Inspired” is the key word here, for contributors have been encouraged to interpret their remit even more broadly than in the editors’ previous two collections (In the Company of Sherlock Holmes, […]

The post Love for Echoes appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
PW chose it as one of their top ten mysteries for the fall, and now Kirkus reviews loves them some Echoes of Sherlock Holmes, too:

Echoes 3D“Inspired” is the key word here, for contributors have been encouraged to interpret their remit even more broadly than in the editors’ previous two collections (In the Company of Sherlock Holmes, 2014, etc.). John Connolly sets the tone by confronting Holmes and Watson, enshrined in a magical library after Holmes’ death, with their inferior post-Reichenbach avatars. David Morrell, Jonathan Maberry, and William Kent Krueger walk similar metafictional tightropes when they arrange debates between Arthur Conan Doyle and a spectral Holmes over spiritualism, bring C. Auguste Dupin to console Watson at Holmes’ empty grave, and present a child-psychologist Watson providing therapy to a boy who believes he’s Sherlock Holmes. Other contributors briskly update the Great Detective. Meg Gardiner‘s sleuth investigates a breach in computer security; Hank Phillippi Ryan‘s Annabelle Holmes follows a trail of pictogram emails to a missing fiancee; Gary Phillips‘ Sherlock, in a rayon shirt and bell-bottoms, investigates the assassination of an iconic civil rights leader; Cory Doctorow explores the problem of a conscience-driven leaker of secret intelligence. Meanwhile, back in the Victorian era, Tasha Alexander sketches a deft and funny prequel to “A Scandal in Bohemia,” Dana Cameron‘s free-wheeling Watson recounts Holmes’ search for a hidden legacy, and Tony Lee and Bevis Musson give Mrs. Hudson a thimble-sized comic-book case more notable for visual style than narrative invention. Sherlock is channeled by Catriona McPherson‘s lady’s maid, Deborah Crombie‘s cheeky goddaughter Sherry Watson, Anne Perry’s TV Holmes, Denise Mina‘s not-a-witch Shirley, and Michael Scott‘s Dublin madam, who assists the police in their investigation of a celebrated real-life theft. Although most of these tales are more notable for their high concepts than the ways they’re worked out, Hallie Ephron‘s tale of a movie actress who once played Irene Adler and is now understudying a much younger Irene is a delight from beginning to end. Though the level of inspiration in individual stories varies widely, every fan will find different reasons to cheer. And they’ll all marvel at the inventive range of this salute to the greatest of all fictional detectives. 

You can pre-order Echoes from Bookshop Santa Cruz, on Amazon/Kindle, Barnes&Noble/Nook, or signed by Les and me (and maybe some others) at the Poisoned Pen when we’re there October 1. There’s also a gorgeous, completely signed limited edition from Mysterious Books, here.

The post Love for Echoes appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
http://laurierking.com/2016/07/love-for-echoes/feed/ 6
Laurie King, poet: slightly above the others http://laurierking.com/2016/07/laurie-king-poet-slightly-others/ http://laurierking.com/2016/07/laurie-king-poet-slightly-others/#comments Wed, 13 Jul 2016 10:00:22 +0000 http://laurierking.com/?p=13237 The kind of books I write are always a compromise. If I did the kind of research I feel they deserve, a novel would take me three, four, six years and stretch to eight hundred pages. This invariably leaves me with a dozen areas where I’m spreading a small amount of research very thin, and […]

The post Laurie King, poet: slightly above the others appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
The kind of books I write are always a compromise. If I did the kind of research I feel they deserve, a novel would take me three, four, six years and stretch to eight hundred pages. This invariably leaves me with a dozen areas where I’m spreading a small amount of research very thin, and with each publication day, I hold my breath, thinking this will be the time Someone Who Knows will wheel out the Big Bertha of scorn and blast me to smithereens.

Take, for example, Dreaming Spies. Parts of the story involved haiku.

Haiku low res copyI used haiku in discussing the culture, I put it at the center of the book’s mystery, and, to add a touch of flavor, I plunked one at the top of each chapter.

Sweet city of minds

Her spires dream, wrapped in earth’s folds

June gilds the lily.

Now, I am no poet. And I know just enough about the subtleties of this form to know that I know nothing. The haiku I wrote for the chapter heads are by way of a jest.

So it tickled me considerably to find my childish efforts taken…well, maybe not seriously, but with serious attention, by a man who knows his haiku. Michael Dylan Welch teaches the form, he wins contests, he’s literally written the book(s) on haiku. And to my astonishment and thrill, not only did he leave his heavy critical artillery unloaded, he is polite about my haiku efforts! I mean, he likes the story itself, calling it a terrific read, but instead of lowering a weighty boot on these silly and puerile encroachments on his area of expertise, when it comes to my (ie, Haruki-san’s) definition of haiku, he calls it “accurate and informed, although basic.” And of my haiku themselves, he says, “Occasionally, one rises slightly above the others in quality.”

Woohoo! I feel as if the kind gent gave me a three foot tall silver trophy when he says, “…we can give the author credit for trying.” His full review (which is attached to a marvelous web site) is here.

Ah: my blushes, Watson!

The post Laurie King, poet: slightly above the others appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
http://laurierking.com/2016/07/laurie-king-poet-slightly-others/feed/ 1
The Somme (4) http://laurierking.com/2016/07/the-somme-4/ http://laurierking.com/2016/07/the-somme-4/#comments Mon, 04 Jul 2016 10:26:20 +0000 http://laurierking.com/?p=13221 I’m giving away a copy of Joe Sacco’s The Great War, what NPR called a “panorama of devastation,” an accordian-fold book, 24 feet long, about day one of The Battle of the Somme. Scroll down to enter. Today is the centenary of the death of Alan Seeger. Seeger was an American poet, an uncle of […]

The post The Somme (4) appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
I’m giving away a copy of Joe Sacco’s The Great War, what NPR called a “panorama of devastation,” an accordian-fold book, 24 feet long, about day one of The Battle of the Somme. Scroll down to enter.

Today is the centenary of the death of Alan Seeger. Seeger was an American poet, an uncle of Pete Seeger and classmate of TS Eliot, who was living in Paris when War broke out on August 4, 1914. Twenty days later, he joined the French Foreign Legion. On July 1, 1916, Seeger entered the Battle of the Somme. He died, aged 28, on the 4th of July. His final known written words, a letter to a friend before moving up to the Front, are those of a poet to his bones:

I am glad to be going in first wave. If you are in this thing at all it is best to be in to the limit. And this is the supreme experience.Gassed, by John Singer Sergeant

Better known is his poem written sometime before the Somme:

I have a rendezvous with Death

At some disputed barricade,

When Spring comes back with rustling shade

And apple-blossoms fill the air—

An Egyptian friend, Rif Baer, described Seeger’s end with an appropriately poetic final image:

He answered with a smile. How pale he was! His tall silhouette stood out on the green of the cornfield. He was the tallest man in his section. His head erect, and pride in his eye, I saw him running forward, with bayonet fixed. Soon he disappeared and that was the last time I saw my friend. . . .”

Anyone else remember the fade-out at the final moments of Black-Adder?

* *

Joe Sacco’s The Great War is a modern Bayeux Tapestry on paper, a detailed panorama of the first day of the Somme battle. To enter my drawing for Joe Sacco’s gorgeous and moving The Great Warpop over here before midnight Monday.

The post The Somme (4) appeared first on Laurie R. King.

]]>
http://laurierking.com/2016/07/the-somme-4/feed/ 5